• Forever Wild

    May 2007 – VFPP and the Town of Telluride successfully raise $50M to acquire the Valley Floor
    June 2008 – The Colorado Supreme Court rules in favor of the Town’s acquisition of the Valley Floor
    August 2009 – The Telluride Town Council unanimously approves a Conservation Easement, perpetually protecting the property as Open Space.

  • 2007 – 2017
    Ten Years Later

    June 1-3 we will gather in Telluride to Celebrate, Educate and Experience the Valley Floor.

    Schedule of Events
  • HISTORY OF THE VALLEY FLOOR

    Visit the Telluride Historical Museum this summer to experience “The Valley Floor: Changing Identities of a Telluride Treasure”.

    Valley Floor Timeline
  • A RIVER RESTORED

    After years of planning and research, the Town of Telluride restored Reach One of the San Miguel River on the Valley Floor into a historical and natural meander.

TELLURIDE VALLEY FLOOR FOREVER WILD

May 2007 – VFPP and the Town of Telluride successfully raise $50M to acquire the Valley Floor

June 2008 – The Colorado Supreme Court rules in favor of the Town’s acquisition of the Valley Floor

August 2009 – The Telluride Town Council unanimously approves a Conservation Easement, perpetually protecting the property as Open Space.

THE VALLEY FLOOR TODAY

The Town of Telluride Open Space Commission in partnership with the San Miguel Conservation Foundation manage the Valley Floor. Management is guided by the conservation values detailed in the Conservation Easement and restoration projects and recreational uses regulated by the Valley Floor Management Plan. While the Conservation Easement is a permanent, unchanging document, the Management Plan is updated every five years. VFPP actively participates in the management discussions and restoration projects.

THE FUTURE OF THE VALLEY FLOOR

Ecological process and human uses are monitored annually as directed by the Telluride Valley Floor Monitoring Plan. Reach One of the San Miguel River Restoration was completed in 2016 and research and planning will begin for downstream reaches and mine tailings remediation in 2017. Local schools and the Watershed Education Project use Valley Floor as a living classroom, creating place-based environmental science opportunities for all ages.